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Pocket for BWOF 09-2007-115

As promised in my post on Saturday, I have made pictures from the second pocket for these pants, that are now almost finished. Hemming to be done tomorrow, and the belt loops still to be made.
Not my favorite pants pattern, (though I love BWOF pants fit). I will not make it again. Apart from the pocket/side panel construction I think it is easiest when you don't need to make size alterations in the waist/hip area (for me there is 2 sizes difference).

This is what I did in the end (and I'm not saying it's the correct way, just found this way by ripping all seams first time, there might be a better way, if you know, please tell). Some pictures have a different color/contrast, this because of trying to show the details.

1. Sew the side seams first

2 Inforce all corners on the front and back pattern, they will be clipped. I did this with fusible interfacing.


3. With right sides together, stitch the pocket from the side seam to the marking on the front (be accurate)


4. Pin the other pocket part, right sides together to the side panel, marking on the pocket matches marking seam on side panel. Stitch between the sideseam and marking.


5. With right sides of pocket together, pin the sidepanel to the back and stitch from pocket to the corner of the back.


6. At the front, clip the seam at the marking



7. Turn pocket to inside, topstitch and make buttonhole


8. Pin front and side panel together at sides, stitch to marking.


9. Stitch pocket seam, together with the front pleat (this is one of the points I don't like so much on the pattern, part of the pocket is hanging quite loose on the inside)


10 Inside view, you can see the pocket and pleat attached together.



11. And finally, the finished pocket.

Comments

  1. thanks for the taking the time to post your progress!

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  2. Nice - thanks for the pictoral tutorial!

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  3. I love the look of these pants. Thank you so much for posting this!

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  4. thanks for the info on that pattern. I was planning on giving it a go. I look forward to seeing the finished pants, even if they aren't your favourites!

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  5. Thank you for taking the time to document how you did this pocket. I just traced off this pattern, and I was checking it for accuracy, when I noticed that the construction of this pocket was going to be tricky.

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  6. Cidell just told me about your review but I didn't know your tutorial when I did my muslin. Thank you so much, it will make the real pants sewing much easier.

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  7. Thanks for posting pictures of the pocket construction, I've been pulling my hair out with it today until I found your post!

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  8. Just wanted to tell you that I'm working on these pants AGAIN and you have AGAIN saved my pocket making life :)

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Comments are very much appreciated! I read all of them, try to answer the questions but don't always have time to react to comments.

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