Skip to main content

Cuff on pants

Thank you for all your nice comments and congratulations on my 10 years of blogging. It’s so nice to know that you appreciate my posts and even are inspired to try something by it.

Today I’ll do a post of the kind I like very much, a tutorial (or my way of doing things). This is about a cuff on pants. It’s been a while since I made a tutorial and I can’t even remember the last time I made cuffs on a pair of pants.

The pattern I’m using is the StyleArc Christia pant. Their description is: A trendy crop pant with all the new style features you have been waiting for. Wide waist band, side pockets, pleats and cuffs that sit just above the ankle gives this casual pant loads of style!

To be very hones I’m in doubt of this style on me, but nothing ventured, nothing gained. I made a pair of trousers last year which were very narrow at ankle height and I confess to not wearing them. These are a little wider and I just wanted to try them.

image

Instructions are sparse and there’s even a pattern piece that’s never mentioned in the instructions. More on that when I’ve completely finished it. So this is my take on doing it, not StyleArcs’ instructions.

For the cuffs I marked the fold lines completely and basted them. On the pattern there’s only a mark at the edge but it’s so much easier to work with the whole line marked on both sides of the fabric. Belief me, it’s worth the extra 10 minutes of doing this.

Then I clipped on the fold lines to the stitch line of the seams (of course not through the stitching). The seam is folded on top of each other and if your fabric is a bit substantial, this will cause a lot of bulk. By clipping and alternating folding to each side of the seam this is more evenly distributed.

IMG_5024

The cuff is folded (right sides together) on the top line (furthest from the hem), pressed and then stitched. This stitchline won’t be visible and helps in keeping shape.

Tip: fold your cuff first without pressing so that you know how it’s supposed to go together.

IMG_5025IMG_5026

The next step is folding over the lowest foldline to the inside and press! Then fold the middle foldline (which is the top of the cuff) over. This is how the inside looks.

IMG_5033

My “trick” to keep the cuff in shape and easer to press after laundering is stitch again behind the cuff. The cuff is folded down and then I stitch through all layers. The last step is a stitch in the ditch in the seams to tack it.

IMG_5031IMG_5032

The resulting cuff:

IMG_5027

The pants are not finished yet. I’ve made a waistband from muslin. The waistband is wide, 7.5 cm (3 inch). The pattern provides a rectangle pattern piece. This is not working on me when the waistband is a normal height, let alone on a waistband twice as high.

Making the waistband from muslin first gives me the opportunity to pin it to my shape. In this picture you can see there’s quite a bit of shaping involved.

IMG_5034

Also I cut the back waist with a very generous seam allowance as I know that’s where I often need to change. I needed an extra 1.5-2 cm. My next step is to make a pattern piece of the waistband.

IMG_5035

It’s King’s day today in The Netherlands, which means it’s a national holiday and lots of flags with an orange banner in the streets. Orange being the name and colour of our royal family.

P4270132

Comments

  1. Hope the pants end up being flattering for you. The cuff is nice, not too wide.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Happy Kings Day! The cuff looks like a great proportion which is what I think Style Arc usually does so well.

    ReplyDelete
  3. These pants are on my radar, so this is SO helpful. I often wonder if StyleArc would be even more successful if they paid more attention to their instructions! I sew quite a few of their patterns but only now that I'm more experienced. And still, I avoid some of their more involved patterns because their instructions often make no sense. (I wish they would at least spellcheck!) Looking forward to the finished pants.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have just taken a Craftsy course on pants fitting, using a Vogue pattern with a wide curved waistband. It has opened my eyes to how much easier it is to fit than a straight one, especially to someone like me with a tummy. All my pants will now have curved waistbands. Happy King's Day.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

It's always nice to have feedback on what I'm posting about. All comments, also positive criticism, are always highly appreciated.
Leuk als je een berichtje schrijft, altijd leuk om te lezen, ook opbouwende kritiek!

Popular posts from this blog

How to sew a sleeveless top with facings

How lovely to read the nice comments on my jacket. Grumpy without coffee commented that the original artist for the cartoon (which apparently was for books) was Sarah Andersen. Thank you for mentioning it. Beckster asked about the way I closed the center back seam of the lining. I did it by machine. She also said “Although I have not tried it, I have been told that the lining can be made by using the pattern minus the seam allowance and facings.” Well, certainly not without seam allowances, it should be without hem and without the facings. Important is that you have about 5 cm hem in the jacket for this to work. And I would always make a center back pleat. It gives you space to move without the lining pulling on the fabric. Next time I make a jacket I will try to make photos of the process of bagging the lining (Patsijean said she would have liked to see them and probably more would be interested). Might take a while though, see the end of this post.-----------------------------I mad…

Hilarious description

This week I bought the January Burda issue and browsing through it this top, and especially its description had my attention. Written by someone who has no understanding of modern, functional fabrics and never goes to the gym. Don’t know whether it’s the same in the English issue of the magazine, but in Dutch it says “Sport shirts often have the disadvantage to be close fitted.  This restricts your movement. Our suggestion: make this shirt with a full draped back.“I didn’t care to check their description of sports shirts they published before, but thought this one was hilarious.Off to trace a pattern from this magazine (not this one).

Lining a vest

In this post I'll describe how to line a vest. This description is based on the technique that is described in a Burda sewing book I have (in Dutch).

For your information: here you can find this description in a PDF-file.

First the result of the vest, I had no buttons to go with it, will add these later.


The back of the lining is cut 3-4 centimeters from the fold of the fabric. This gives moving space and prevents your outer fabric from pulling.


Sew the center back seam partially: 5 centimeters on the top, and a few centimetres in the waist and on the bottom.



Sew outside of vest as normal, but do not sew the side seams.


Sew lining, without sewing side seams.

Pin and seam vest and lining at front, armholes and back hem. Stitch to the exact seamline of the sideseam, not over it (see next picture)



Make sure you mark the side seam, to be sure that you do not stitch too far.


Clip all round seams, grade seams if your fabric is thick.


Turn the vest by putting your hand through the side s…