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Sewing, not blogging

It’s been a few weeks again. I’ve been sewing, but have not taken the time to write blog posts. Apart from time, it has also to do with a feeling that there’s nothing new to tell. I’m sewing basic things, some I’ve sewn often before. Like this blouse:

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The pattern is from Ottobre, with a few changes for fit (mainly hip area). Over the years I’ve sewn several variations, from plain white (always useful) to very colourful ones, like this new one. I bought the fabric recently and it’s a lovely quality cotton. A lot like Liberty cotton, but Liberty prints aren’t my style. I liked this fabric because of the irregular print and the many colours. A lot of combinations are possible. A teal skirt in exact the right shade is on my to do list. A summer top that’s a nice variation from my default black/white theme.

Which brings me to the next top, made from a viscose (rayon) fabric that’s been in my closet for a while.

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This is the Knip Mode pattern (April 2017 issue) that I showed in my previous post. Nice result though the neckline is a bit wide on my narrow shoulders. I’m pleased with the look of the darts in the neckline. I will probably wear this top quite a bit during summer but will not use it for the silk fabric that I considered using with this pattern. It’s a quick make with no surprises. The neckline has a wide facing, which is easier to sew than a strip of bias binding.

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There are a few other garments “in production”. More on those later.

Comments

  1. Thank you for sharing, Sigrid. It's always good to see what you are up to. I particularly like the black and white top.

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  2. I love how your Knipmode top turned out! My concern was the neckline being too high, never a good look on me. Yours looks much better than the magazine pic. The Ottobre top is also stunning!

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  3. Love the colors in that summer blouse and the Knipmode is nicer than I expected also. Great facing detail is what makes them such classic patterns.

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  4. I agree about Liberty of London fabrics. They are pretty but they seem to lack something, drama maybe? This print on the other hand is fabulous. It works so well with this blouse. Pretty and chic. I love the b&w blouse a lot too. Two very useful additions to your wardrobe.

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  5. This blouse turned out well!
    Sigrid, I have a sewing question: Being an experienced sewist, don't you find Ottobre patterns shapeless and too basic in general ? As of lately, it seems that the blogosphere is divided between Burda lovers and Ottobre lovers (at least in Spanish blogs). I don't know where Patrones sewists are hiding...
    I have been browsing through Ottobre magazines at my newsagent's and they don't seem very inspiring...
    Would love to know your opinion.
    Congratulations for your blog and Happy Easter!!

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  6. If you feel the top is too wide across the shoulders you can always wear a matching strappy top under it as a feature. x

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  7. Love the print in the first top. I mean I like both. But, the print in the first is dreamy.

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  8. Hi Sigrid! I like the multi coloured material and both blouses look good.

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  9. Your multi coloured top will be perfect in spring and summer with all those colours. It is nice to see the black and white top made up and still sounds like it will get some wear.

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  10. Nice and elegant, loved the printing of abstract on the shirt. This is really good work, thank you for sharing it with us

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Comments are very much appreciated! I read all of them, try to answer the questions but don't always have time to react to comments.

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