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Does this happen to you?

 

The title is referring to not being able to find a pattern. I bought a little piece of fabric I want to make the sorbetto top of. I’ve made the pattern twice before, have tweaked the fit to my liking and now I can NOT find the pattern, nowhere. Seems to have disappeared. Has this happened to you? Frustrating. I know I made a size 10, but have to reprint and tape the sheets together again, which I don’t like. Worst is that I did some change to get rid of armhole gaping. Well, I thought I would whip it up tonight, but will not happen.

I got quite a bit done this week, the skirt has only some handstitching left (why does it always takes longer when I reach that point to finish a garment?). Pictures on me to follow later this week. Without red block, it was too late to get that into the pattern. I would have had to make it all over again. I like it enough just in the black and white.

And yesterday I made a cowl neck top that I’m actually wearing today already. I’ll show you that one also in another post. For now I leave you with an impression of pictures from the latest bra. Working together with Pauline 2 weeks ago got me all inspired again. I simply LOVE this fabric/lace combination.

 

Comments

  1. Funny you would bring this up. I was just looking at some directions for the Sorbetto sans pattern! Have decided I could make a reasonable facsimile by using s sleeveless pattern, cutting the front as one piece rather than on the fold, and "pleating" the fabric before I cut the front. Might work....

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  2. The fabric for this bra is exquisite. As soon as I get a few "have to do's" taken care of I really am thinking of trying a bra. I am in need....

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  3. Gorgeous lingerie!!!

    YES, that happens to me, all too often.

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  4. Yes, more than I care to admit. So I spend the time I would have spent to make the garment and find the pattern when it is too late to continue.

    I hope you find it soon. Your projects are always beautiful.

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  5. how annoying you can't find the pattern - its got to be there somewhere. The fabric you bought for the bra is lovely - so pretty. I too am trying to make a white bra from my stash pieces.

    Look forward to seeing the skirt and cowl neck top on in due course.

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  6. Yep, been there, done that. What's really annoying is when it's an entire pattern (I lost a Kwik Sew once and it was expensive to replace).

    I keep thinking I need to make the Sorbetto, but I haven't done it yet. I'm just not motivated to print all the pages and tape them together...but then, that's the tradeoff for a free pattern, I suppose! Hope you find yours soon!

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  7. Here's the free sorbetto pattern @ Colette patterns: http://www.coletterie.com/colette-patterns-news/free-pattern-to-download-the-sorbetto-top

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  8. Yes, I've done this (too) many times. I can also lose a pattern piece while I'm in the process of cutting it out. Sometimes I find it quickly, sometimes not.

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  9. Yes I've been there but this time I have misplaced a whole book! Maybe the pattern is folded in with other drafted patterns?

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  10. YES! I'm making shorts this weekend and really wanted to compare my HP sailor pants with this Burda pattern. Can't find my HP pattern. I also can't find a swim top that I wanted to make. Grrrr. This may speak more to me needing to clean my sewing room more than anything else, LOL!

    Sigrid. You make me want to hop on a plane and shop at Kantje Boord everytime you post a new garment.

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  11. I really like that lace / fabric combo as well. Very pretty!

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  12. I have a pants pattern that I was sure I'd accidentally thrown out show up months after I stopped looking for it.
    This has got to be one of the most striking bras you've done. The fabric is stunning.

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  13. I have lost a pile of Kwiksew patterns I bought in Florida last year. I have just the fabric for one of them.

    I bet when I find the pattern, I will have lost the fabric.

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  14. What a lovely flowery lace you used for that bra. It is beautiful!

    Losing patterns, well, it doesn't really happen to me inside the house. But it did happen multiple times that I loaned a pattern to a friend and never got it back. I hate it when that happens. It's just like loaning out a book you love and then never get back. It makes me sad.

    But anyway. I hope you will find it back!

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  15. Oh, I love the fabric and lace you chose, too! Me. studiously worked all weekend to achieve a bra in all cotton woven fabrics from my scrap pile, that fits me well without using any elastic or stretch fabric at all. Version 3 is a success-enough-to-wear, needs only a few tweaks for the next making. Sigrid, I am so inspired by the lovely undergarments you share with us; and -- now -- only mildly envious that you have ready access to proper bra-making supplies.

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  16. It used to happen to me when I kept fabric and pattern together for future projects. Invariably I changed my mind and then I had to hunt for the pattern, according to the last future project is was associated with :-). Now that I'm very rigid about keeping patterns together I'm cured. Might something of the sort be happening here?

    Great lace and fabric! You continue to be an inspiration :-).

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  17. I agree ! The combo is super nice!

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  18. Pretty bra! I always lose patterns, or especially little pieces that I've adjusted. And then it'll appear magically months later under some fabric. It is very frustrating!

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