Wednesday, May 19, 2010

What you won’t see later

I took some time this afternoon to work on the jacket. When I bought the fabric, the lady of the shop showed me a picture of a jacket with the edges only serged and obviously not very structured on the inside. She said this was a good fabric to make such a jacket. Apart from the serged edges (not my style) initially I thought I would make it not very structured, but I changed my mind and it will be a tailored, linen jacket. Though I use some shortcuts in tailoring, like I usually do.

As I told in my previous post I interfaced the whole jacket, and treated the interfaced pattern pieces as “the fabric”, therefor I used extra interfacing where I would do that in a non-interfaced fabric.

The result on the inside: a back stay of silk organza.

I sewed a shoulder stay of hair canvas to the fusible interfacing, and cut the interfacing on the roll line and took off 3 mm at the body part (as described in the book Tailoring). The hair canvas is not fusible, this was a solution to that “problem”.

The result after applying stay tape to the roll line too.

The stay tape is sewn by machine, except for the last centimeters, that are done by hand. That will make sure the machine stitching won’t be seen from the outside.

I wanted to include a poll, but that is not working properly. I wanted to ask you: do you like these posts about plans and construction details, or do you prefer to see only the end result?

30 comments:

sonoemi said...

I like to see more on plans and construction details.

Kaitlin said...

I agree - please keep those plans and construction details coming, especially when pictures are included. I love seeing those details that you wouldn't otherwise see in a finished product!

neighbourhood.gal said...

Yes to the details of construction! Problem solving information is invaluable.

Dinah said...

Plans and details!!! I learn so much watching the process you do. Thank you for taking the time to take pictures and document everything.

luckylibbet said...

YES, YES, YES to the plans and construction details. You're an amazing resource to the world-wide sewing community! In fact, your use of organza in this project gave me an idea for the linen trousers I'll be working on shortly. Thanks!

Connie B said...

Both hands up in the air for plans and construction details! You should see how close my nose is to the monitor so as not to miss any detail!

Nancy K said...

I love to see the plans and construction detail.

Erica said...

Definitely enjoy reading the construction details! Very helpful and educational. Thank you.

BetsyV said...

To me, the construction details are more interesting and helpful than the finished piece. Particularly for a tailored garment such as this one.

Tina said...

Another hand up for plans and construction details!

KID, MD said...

I love to see the process, especially for something like this, where once you put in the lining we'll never get to see how you got there. Keep it coming!!

nowaks nähkästchen said...

Details, give me details, the process and everything! :)

If I just want to see the result I can use pattern review...

elle said...

I stopped home sewing for quilting but I'm so tired of ready to wear. Fit was never my strong suit and I'm trying to decide if I could sew garments that actually fitted. You have been an eye opener for me as I've followed along this past month. Please continue to give plans, details and technique. They are appreciated. It is also interesting that many quilters are also asking for less 'show and tell' and more of the whole process.

Kelley said...

Absolutely love the construction details. Thanks for being so generous with your time and knowledge.

Kelley

arnysews said...

I am also a yes to the construction details. I have been sewing on and off for 30 years but didn't realise how much I didn't know until I started reading blogs. Thanks for sharing.

Gail said...

Construction details are so useful.

debbie said...

Yes to the details. I don't really do much in the way of tailoring but it's nice to have places to go for details if needed.

Lori said...

I really like posts about construction, helps me so much to become a better sewer.

AllisonC said...

I don't often manage to do it myself but construction photos are really interesting and help us all learn new things. Definitely keep them up!

JoanneM said...

I am thrilled by the generosity of any sewist who is willing to share construction details. Thank you and keep it up!

anilin said...

Yes the construction details are very interesting. Especially about how to interface. Detail photos tell so much.

alethia said...

I would like to see more plans and construction details

Joyce in NC said...

I really enjoy the plans and construction details. It is very educational for me.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

I will never do all the effort you do, but I love seeing how it should really be done!

Faye Lewis said...

Well, I'm impressed. Lots of work but well worth the effort.

Vicki said...

I like to see all the gory details! We all learn so much from each others experiences. And of course the end product then takes on more significance if we have been along for the ride. But eye candy is always nice too :) So whatever you feel like posting is always appreciated.

Maricou said...

sewing blogs would not be sewing blogs without all the inside stories
Thanks for taking the time and sharing your knowledge

senaSews said...

I really enjoy seeing all the construction details - especially since i really don't now anything about tailoring techniques and always enjoxy learning new things!

a little sewing on the side said...

I thoroughly appreciate the construction posts. It is extra work to take pictures along the way, but it is so helpful to us readers. I wish I did it more often. Of course, the end result is always a pleasure, too!

Omega said...

Please keep construction detail going it helps a lot and thanks for sharing your knowledge.