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Burda magazine

As most of you will know, I use Burda magazine patterns a lot. I haven’t counted but I think that around 2 out of 3 garments I make are (based on) a Burda magazine pattern. They do have consistent sizing, I know what to change for my figure. I know I’ve had my share of posts/rants on their photos (hiding what the pattern is about), complained about the diy projects or not having nice patterns any more and stopping my subscription. But they certainly have interesting patterns again and I renewed my subscription, because often after a while I saw a pattern made up and finding out I didn’t have that particular issue. Apparently I sometimes have to get used to a style/trend and am a late adapter.
There is a change though in the instructions apparently. Yesterday evening I was browsing the November issue and wondering about yardage and the way they placed the pattern pieces on the fabric for a specific pattern. To my surprise and dismay: there are not cutting layouts in the November issue!
I checked and the October issue still has them.
Yet another thing they are saving on? The pattern sheets changed a few years ago and there are less sheets and more lines on the remaining pattern sheets. Being used to tracing sheets I still think Burda has one of the most comprehensible sheets and compared to the time when all lines were a complete mess, the current sheets aren’t that bad. But strange enough I miss the cutting layouts. I might not always use the exact way of placing the pattern pieces, but they are great for checking whether you have all pieces, didn’t miss a “cut on the fold” instruction, have all pieces that you have to draw yourself, a cuff or pocket flap for example. And they always indicated where they intended where interfacing is to be used. I don’t use the written instructions much, but the drawings of the pattern pieces and those cutting are very helpful. And I’m convinced they help sewists with less experience.
What are your thoughts? Do you use cutting layouts or not?
For fun: part of a pattern sheet from a 1973 issue .
IMG_1460

Comments

  1. I just went checking my Portuguese edition November issue and you're right! The cutting layouts are missing! I usually don't need them, but they are useful to some of us

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    Replies
    1. I agree to your "I usually don't need them", but still think they are good to have, especially when it's a complicated pattern with many pieces.

      Delete
  2. Dear Sigrid,

    You are right, since november the plan is missing, and there was a huge excitement not only in germany because of this, please see https://www.burdastyle.de/forum/anregungen/schnittauflage-anleitungshefte-antwort-burda or https://www.burdastyle.de/forum/anregungen/les-fran-ais-ne-sont-pas-contents-der-aerger-ist-ueberall-gross

    Short answer from burda style was: „We have decided to omit the cutting plans in burda style in the future. Extensive survey analyses have shown that the readers of the burda style edition are so well versed in sewing that they do not need the plans or do not use them at all. Especially since we have always shown only the largest size and in the smaller sizes it is possible to save fabric through individual editions. Instead, we now offer two sewing school models per issue to all newcomers to sewing who don't yet feel up to the challenge of the instructions in the sewing journal. Of course, the cutting plans are still included here. The same goes for our single cuts and the Easy edition.
    As an experienced burda-style hobby tailor you will get along without the plans, we are convinced!“

    But a huge amount of sewers weren't satisfied with this answer and we will see, whether burda will change anything in the future.

    Kind regards, Beate

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    Replies
    1. Hi Beate, thank you for the links and the translation of Burda's answer. As I can read German I've read a lot of the comments now. It's strange they rely on customers with experience so much and think that adding two workshop patterns is enough for those with less experience. Let's not talk about the workshop for the complicated dress, which has an incorrect illustration for the lining (no waist seam while the cutting layout indicates a waist seam) and introduction of a balanced dart, a concept most of us either don't know or only use when needed for a specific fabric. Not for beginners!

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    2. Dear Sigrid,

      The cutting layout will be back with the March 2019 issue.
      https://www.hobbyschneiderin24.net/portal/showpost.php?p=2648282&postcount=23

      Beate

      Delete
  3. Oh I have traced a couple of things and didn't even notice! You are right they were quite useful for checking you had all the self drafted bits etc., but I will manage without them. I will take that over those 1973 pattern sheets - yikes!!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I'll manage too. Still will miss them for more complicated patterns

      Delete
  4. Have to say, I do not use the layouts at all. Many times I am trying to make the most out of a piece of fabric that is somewhat less than the recommended amount--layouts don't help with that! I usually recommend that beginners not use Burda magazine patterns because of the instructions, and so I am not sure how many people actually use them (for that purpose). Reminds me, I have to renew soon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With a bit of guidance (sewing lessons, that most beginners start with) I think quite a few patterns from the magazine can be used by beginners too.
      I won't cancel my subscription, even though I have many already, actually started subscribing again a few months ago.

      Delete
  5. I didn’t notice this time but then I just made that top with the asymmetric seam and so there were 4 pieces total. I would likely be bothered for larger projects though — outerwear or a dress with many pattern pieces. It’s a bit of a disappointment. They could do FAR FEWER crafty things for sure.

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    Replies
    1. It's the wrap dress in the November issue that made me aware of the missing layouts: large pattern piece, 3 meter of fabric. That's when I wanted to check how Burda planned the placement on the fabric. Like you it's for larger and complicated patterns that I would want them.

      Delete
  6. As I still haven't bought the French November issue I can't tell you if the layout is missing. Though I layout my pattern pieces my own way I found it very useful to know what has to be interfaced.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Each of us used the information in her (his) own way, depending on experience. It's sad to see this information going away.

      Delete
  7. I agree, I use the layout the same way, to count pattern pieces and check where interfacing is neeeded. Don't care much for the crafty bits, skip that and bring the layouts back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here! Exactly!
      And what I miss even more are the complete sizing charts (with back length, front waist length, bust point and so on).
      Omitting the cutting layouts and the sizing charts clearly is a quality downslide.

      Delete
    2. Yes, another thing they no longer supply. I missed that too, but fortunately have so many old issues that included that, that I didn't take much notice. Should be included or easily available.

      Delete
  8. I haven't used layouts for a gazillion years, I find they are usually wasteful of yardage so I squeeze everything into the smallest area possible!

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  9. Interesting! I hadn't noticed the cutting layouts were missing. I think for a complex project like a coat with a lot of pieces I would probably look at the layout as a quick way to check if I've cut all the pieces and cut the appropriate amount. Seems like anyone who is not a more advanced sewer would need to look at them and they could include. OR they could print more info on the pattern shape on the tracing sheet, such as Cut 2, etc. and YES - get rid of the crafty stuff - so useless!

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    Replies
    1. Considering the many lines on a pattern sheet I would not like to have more info printed there, Working without the layouts is easy enough for advanced sewists, but like you say too: it's a good way to check complex patterns and very useful/necessary for the less experienced. At some point a beginner grows to intermediate and those to advanced. As a pattern publisher I wouldn't want to estrange a whole (younger) group of sewists by making it more and more difficult to use the patterns.

      Delete
  10. Thanks for the information. I alway do it my way without the layouts. Only sometimes when there are very many pieces.

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    Replies
    1. That's exactly what I use it for; many pieces or complicated layouts. Just like to have them in for all to use as they need/want them. Apparently they are missed.

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  11. I rarely use the layouts, but sometimes it clarifies some minor question. It must save a few pages, and pages are money and it's all about the bottom line. The patterns sheets are another matter. I have definitely had times when I really have trouble finding the pattern piece I need.

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  12. Wow! While I don't often rely on the cutting layout, I did look at it to find out what pieces need interfacing and the diagram helped me understand a more complicated pattern. I too favour Burda for the consistent drafting. Though my output of Burda will drop off a lot since we no longer have a distribution company for Burda in Canada. I'm haven't taken to the printing and tiling of pdf patterns.

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