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2 yards of fabric–a coat!

Many, many years ago I participated in a contest on PatternReview and won a prize. I think it was second or third place, but I can’t remember which contest it was. The prize was fabric from Textile Studio (a company that no longer exists) and I chose a lovely wool fabric. It was 2 yards (which is 1.80 meter). Every year when I examined fabrics in my collection at the beginning of the autumn/winter season, this piece of fabric came out and I always thought “I must make some special jacket from it” and back it went in my closet for that special pattern that I would someday make from it.

This year I realised that my taste in jackets has changed and I no longer wanted a jacket from it, but that it would make a lovely coat. That provided a challenge: only 2 yards of fabric and the desire to make a coat from it. Sounds like mission impossible, doesn’t it? It took some browsing of patterns, pattern magazines and of course the internet and I found it. I checked all my Burda magazines from the August-January range and couldn’t find a suitable pattern. Having decided it should be a coat without a collar (too much fabric needed) and I googled something like “Burda coat without collar), a pattern from the March 2012 issue came up. I hadn’t checked my March issues, as I did not think that a March issue would have a pattern for a coat I was looking for.

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Luckily I had that issue in my collection and decided that this would be my project to be made in my sewing days with friends. I planned a few changes: bound buttonholes instead of snaps, pockets with flaps instead of inseam pockets. For the pockets I took the position and shape from a Burda magazine from 2007! It is helpful to have a collection of over 100 Burda magazines Smile.

A few in progress pictures to get an idea of how it looks and how the inside is done.

Sample of the buttonhole, which is not done in the official way, but using the “window” method. Bottom right you can see the “window”, which is done with silk organza.

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The welts for the buttonholes, made of faux leather. On the inside is a piping cord, which you can see peeking out on a few.

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Buttonholes and welt for pocket done.

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All pattern pieces were block fused with a middle weight coat interfacing. I did that first (still at home) and after the block fusing marked the seamlines on the pieces.

I thought the  the fabric was not thick enough for winter temperatures, even after the fusible interfacing was applied. All pieces were interlined with a flannel. For this I cut all the pattern pieces without seam allowance and used a catch stitch to attach it (did take some time!). After that the rest was relatively easy.

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Front shield as in most of my jackets applied here too.

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Sleeve head and shoulder pad inserted.

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Almost finished. I still have to insert the lining. As said, I’m still travelling and this last step will be done when I’m back home again.

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To conclude this picture heavy post a photo of the white cliffs, close to the location where I was with my sewing friends. I’ve been at several places along the south coast of the UK this time and wow, what breath-taking views! So different from county to county.

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Comments

  1. Aren't you the clever one. The coat looks beautiful. You do such an amazing job on the details. Those buttonholes! Hope you'll give us some shots of you wearing the coat.

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  2. Beautiful work. I love to see the insides....

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  3. Beautiful! The flannel as an interlining is a great idea. Thanks for the clear photos of the work in progress.

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  4. You definitely succeeded in making a special and beautiful coat from this fabric!

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  5. I made that coat using a heavy linen. I absolutely love the lines. Maybe I should try a heavier version and if I do, I'll refer back to this entry. Thanks.

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  6. Burda never fails! :) That is miraculous to find an outerwear piece that isn't short/jacket length that you can make with 2 yards! It looks fantastic. Love the contrasting welts and bound buttonholes.

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  7. Echt een prachtige bestemming heeft die gewonnen gestof gekregen. De details van nepleer zijn fantastisch!

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  8. Beautiful coat! Love the work in progress posts!

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  9. Absolutely beautiful work! Do you make the pattern for the front shields based on each pattern you use. Would you explain how you do this. Thank you for posting the details of your lovely work.

    Marie

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  11. Beautiful as always! Can't wait to see it on you. I love the corded buttonholes. I love seeing your more complicated sewing. It's always so perfect. Great place to go to sew ! Gorgeous

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  12. I love seeing the insides too! Its going to look beautiful.

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  13. It's going to be a gorgeous and most of all, well tailored coat!

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  14. This is going to be beautiful!

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  15. That´s a Lovely coat and impressive that it worked with so Little fabric

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  16. Beautiful, Sigrid. I love your details and their beautiful execution. Those buttonholes are gorgeous out of the faux leather and the cording really gives them a pop. Love this.

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  17. Looks beautiful -I'll have forgotten all my tailoring techniques by the time I get my new sewing room up and running.

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