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Rolled hem on thin fabric

Progress on the Chanel style jacket is slow, as expected. I do plan to share my progress and a few construction details with you, but to start with I accidentally erased the first pictures from the memory card. And Sheila, I don’t want to raise the bar for anyone but myself. It’s been on my to sew list for a long time, I’m happy I finally started it, but not quite sure how long it will take, it might be quite a bit longer than I thought.

 

To differentiate a bit, I’m working on a blouse as well, part of the new spring garments I want to make. This is a sheer, thin fabric as you can see in the pictures, the grid shows through the fabric. I tried to serge the edge of the collar that will be folded to the inside (it’s a wrap blouse) and didn’t get it right. In a Dutch  book on serger techniques using a water soluble stabilizer was advised. I didn’t have that anymore. Instead I used a fusible table, ironed it in the seam allowance and then serged with a rolled hem on the inner edge of the tape. This worked perfectly and the hem is straight and a bit firm.

Next post either on the blouse or the jacket.

Comments

  1. That is a great tip! Do you trim it back to the stitching line or leave as is?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sigrid,

    There is a free downloadable program that will allow you to recover your pictures from the memory card if you want to retrieve them. They are not truly deleted, and can be extracted. I lost many pictures at one time, and was able to successfully retrieve them using a free program. I cannot remember which one I used, but a google search shows many results.

    Good luck!

    Andrea

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sigrid, I am curious to know why you did not want to use french seams for that fabric ? As for your pictures, if you did not take any new pictures on your memory card you can retrieve them as Andrea said with those softwear: http://www.lexar.com/products/lexar-image-rescue-4-software?category=429
    or http://www.lc-tech.com/software/rprodetail.html
    Good luck !

    ReplyDelete

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