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Back from the UK

I’m back from a wonderful holiday in the UK.

My husband I did a lot of walks in the first week, we visited Pauline and Mike in their new home, spent an afternoon with sewing friend Vivien and her husband and in the last week our children joined us. We had the most gorgeous wheather, my face and arms haven’t been as tanned in years. Home was very far away for a few weeks, as was blogging and blog reading for most of the time. It was good to take a long break.

Before I resume my blogging about sewing (a sleeveless blouse and a skirt were almost finished before I left) a few pictures of the last weeks. Pauline is holding samfire in her hands that we picked on the shores and ate that evening. I can so understand she has limited time for sewing at the moment.

DSC01646 DSC01612 DSC01599 DSC01549 DSC01519 DSC01499 20140721_123613 20140721_115606 20140718_150739 20140718_141444 20140718_122320 20140710_105657 boot

I am aware that during these weeks my country was struck by the horrors of the Malaysian airplane being shot down and so many people lost their lives, most of them Dutch. The horrible aftermath that is still happening. I have no words for this. Only wish the violence in the world would stop. So many areas of conflict and war. Horrible.

Comments

  1. Welcome back. What a beautiful countryside you visited and how nice to spend time with sewing friends! I am so sorry for the sadness your country men and women have had to endure.

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  2. So good to hear you are well. The disaster has really effected us here in Australia too. We had the second highest number of casualties. I have been thinking of you and your country. Glad to hear you have been enjoying the beauty of England.

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  3. Sometimes the pain and sadness in the world makes me feel overwhelmed by grief. Time in nature and with close friends and family can be so healing. So good to see your post.

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  4. I am so sorry for the Netherlands at the moment . We have been feeling very sad here in Oz too.i am so happy that you enjoyed your holiday so much .

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  5. It's gorgeous a far cry from the horrors going on in the world. Glad you were able to have a good holiday anyway.

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  6. It must be awesome in UK! I love that country a lot! The photos up there look awesome!!

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  7. Oh those phlox. Such a sweet and delicate reminder of summer. I bet they smelled sweet.

    Ponder the possible joys that each person on the plane had in their life before their tragic exit. When you do that, think of the smell of the phlox. I don't know why, but thinking positive thoughts for them will help ease the burdens of their loved ones who remain. I don't even know why I'm writing this, but it feels right, so I'm trusting my instincts.

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  8. So you went to Essex? The big skies in your beach photos and your mention of samphire, made me think of Norfolk

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