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Mwah – not enthousiastic

The past week I spent my sewing time with this jacket from Knip Mode March. I liked it mostly from the line drawing, as the pictures don’t show it too clear. Though it’s a good example what a different look you get from using a differnt fabric or when wearing another style clothes with it. It has sleeve vents, single welt pockets and a collar with a corner taken out of it (don’t know how to say this in English).

The fabric I used was from my stash, bought last year in a sale for about the same price as muslin fabric. I skipped the muslin stage for that reason, just wanted to see how an unaltered size 40 would be on me. That size is the correct bust size for me. My experience with Knip Mode is that I don’t have to alter the length above the waist, as they draft for taller women than Burda does.

That assumption was right, but I don’t quite like the result on other points. And strange enough: half way this week when I tried it on I thought it was better.  
The bust dart is not in the right place (too much to the side) which gives strange space at the sides. In the picture this is even exaggerated, as I am standing and DD kept sitting in her chair while she took the pictures.

The sleeves might be a bit longer as well.

Also the opening in the collar is a bit lower than I thought it would be and around the bust it tends to go outward. I´m inclined to say that a button would be needed higher on the front as well, though there´s no space for it.

I think the issues have to do with my figure more than with the pattern, which was drafted well and was in general not too difficult to sew. For the single welt pockets I referred to Kenneth King´s book Couture techniques and the sleeve vent I used the tutorial I once made myself (see the tab Tutorials above).  The sleeve went in very smoothly and didn’t have too much ease. I added a sleevehead but no shoulder pads.

For me this is another “result not as expected/planned” project, nothing really lost except time, but it confirms the need for a muslin when I make a new jacket pattern. I worked on this jacket almost every evening in the past week, which is a pity if I won’t wear it. A muslin would have cost me only one evening.

Comments

  1. Hi Sigrid, I like this jacket very much but understand your comments. I find I need to do toiles for most garments these day to get the fit I want to achieve.

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  2. Hi Sigrid,

    I've been enjoying your blog from the US. Your sewing is amazing!

    The collar on this jacket is unusual, but I guess I'd call it a "notched" collar in English.

    Linda

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  3. It's a nice style, but your Chanel jacket fits so much better. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and make a muslin. Did you try tissue fitting this?

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  4. Hm, I think you're absolutely right, the fit of this jacket is a bit odd. I agree that muslins tend to be necessary for jackets but I won't make muslins for things in cheap fabrics either.

    I was wondering about the pattern though: Before being printed in Knip's march issue, it already appeared in My Image magazine for spring 2011. With the same pictures (which is probably why those are slightly out of tune for Knip, and why they picked so many bold prints), which makes me wonder about the connection between those magazines.

    One other point (and only because your garments are usually expertly fitted): for my taste, the sleeve heads probably could have used more added ease. In some pictures, there's a slightly stress line in the sleeve from the arm pit out to the shoulder. As far as I know, that indicates a slightly too low sleeve head.
    Obviously, it's very minor compared to the other flaws in the fit which you already pointed out, but I'd like to mention it because so many people seem to feel that ease in sleeve heads is a bad thing. Which it really isn't.

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  5. What a shame! The construction is beautiful as ever, but the fit is not as good as your chanel-style jacket. I guess you have to give new styles a try now and then to see if they will be good. I see what you mean about doing a toile. I usually don't want to do one because I am lazy. I only tend to do them when the fashion fabric is precious.

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  6. Daughters are cruel. Why do they insist of taking photos from the waist tilting upwards! I quite like your jacket - you can wear it and perfect the next version.

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  7. What a shame. You did a beautiful job. Can you take in the upper chest area? It certainly is still wearable. Just not your usual perfection.

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  8. It's a lovely jacket Sigrid but I see what you mean, the proportions need tweaking. How about a give away? :))

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  9. Hi, I think you are too hard on yourself. I think it is wearable and it actually looks great with your white pants (trousers). Maybe leaving it open so you would be happier to wear it. Only those who sew may notice non perfect fit and I also think when you are standing still looking intently at something you are bound to see the imperfections. However, when you are walking around and doing your stuff.. no one (probably not even you) will notice. This attitude probably reflects my imperfect fit and acceptance of it!

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  10. Thanks for this review. I have this on my 'want-to-make-list' but now I'm hesitating.
    Although I still think your jacket is very wearable (colour is lovely), it's a pity that the fit is maybe not what it should be.

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  11. I agree with Summer Flies--you are being too hard on yourself. That said, I am in awe of your discipline and high standards.

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  12. Hi Sigrid,
    I think that this is a general problem with Knip patterns. As far as I remember they are based on a C-Cup and maybe that's why the darts and also princess seams are too far on the side of the pattern. You can see this problem on many of the models. Nevertheless I like Knip patterns.
    Sonia

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  13. I am sorry you don't feel you can wear the jacket. It looks lovely on you, and I absolutely love the neckline.

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  14. Don't flog yourself too much, you know that a muslin is truly helpful only if the fabric is exactly the same as what you're going to use. Also, this might work better a bit later in the year, with a sweater vest under it or something to fluff it out a bit??
    I don't think there's any way to avoid some disappointment in finished project entirely though - it's part of experimenting, which is what keeps us sewing. Sorry you're still on an unhappy streak with your sewing though, sooo frustrating.

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  15. Most sewist are so hard on their projects. I like your jacket. I would have liked to see a picture unbuttoned. This has always been my trick with ready to wear jackets that don't fit like made to fit. I wear them open. The colour is neat with jeans or white pants as you wore them with. Live it there for a while and take it back after. You might like it better.

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