Sunday, April 30, 2017

The magazine goes to …

Anne

I’m a day later than I said I would post this. Just didn’t have time yesterday. There were 14 ladies interested and the majority for the Knip mode magazine.

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Anne, if you send me an email with the address to send the Knip mode to, I’ll post it to you this week. Hope you enjoy it.

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As much as I hoped to finish the pants yesterday, that didn’t work out either. We got a lot of work done in the allotment garden. Such fun to eat lettuce we’ve sown and grown ourselves (in the greenhouse).

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And it looks like we’re going to have tomatoes. They survived the cold spell we had (the greenhouse is not heated).

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My next post will be sewing related, I promise.

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Cuff on pants

Thank you for all your nice comments and congratulations on my 10 years of blogging. It’s so nice to know that you appreciate my posts and even are inspired to try something by it.

Today I’ll do a post of the kind I like very much, a tutorial (or my way of doing things). This is about a cuff on pants. It’s been a while since I made a tutorial and I can’t even remember the last time I made cuffs on a pair of pants.

The pattern I’m using is the StyleArc Christia pant. Their description is: A trendy crop pant with all the new style features you have been waiting for. Wide waist band, side pockets, pleats and cuffs that sit just above the ankle gives this casual pant loads of style!

To be very hones I’m in doubt of this style on me, but nothing ventured, nothing gained. I made a pair of trousers last year which were very narrow at ankle height and I confess to not wearing them. These are a little wider and I just wanted to try them.

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Instructions are sparse and there’s even a pattern piece that’s never mentioned in the instructions. More on that when I’ve completely finished it. So this is my take on doing it, not StyleArcs’ instructions.

For the cuffs I marked the fold lines completely and basted them. On the pattern there’s only a mark at the edge but it’s so much easier to work with the whole line marked on both sides of the fabric. Belief me, it’s worth the extra 10 minutes of doing this.

Then I clipped on the fold lines to the stitch line of the seams (of course not through the stitching). The seam is folded on top of each other and if your fabric is a bit substantial, this will cause a lot of bulk. By clipping and alternating folding to each side of the seam this is more evenly distributed.

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The cuff is folded (right sides together) on the top line (furthest from the hem), pressed and then stitched. This stitchline won’t be visible and helps in keeping shape.

Tip: fold your cuff first without pressing so that you know how it’s supposed to go together.

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The next step is folding over the lowest foldline to the inside and press! Then fold the middle foldline (which is the top of the cuff) over. This is how the inside looks.

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My “trick” to keep the cuff in shape and easer to press after laundering is stitch again behind the cuff. The cuff is folded down and then I stitch through all layers. The last step is a stitch in the ditch in the seams to tack it.

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The resulting cuff:

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The pants are not finished yet. I’ve made a waistband from muslin. The waistband is wide, 7.5 cm (3 inch). The pattern provides a rectangle pattern piece. This is not working on me when the waistband is a normal height, let alone on a waistband twice as high.

Making the waistband from muslin first gives me the opportunity to pin it to my shape. In this picture you can see there’s quite a bit of shaping involved.

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Also I cut the back waist with a very generous seam allowance as I know that’s where I often need to change. I needed an extra 1.5-2 cm. My next step is to make a pattern piece of the waistband.

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It’s King’s day today in The Netherlands, which means it’s a national holiday and lots of flags with an orange banner in the streets. Orange being the name and colour of our royal family.

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Sunday, April 23, 2017

10 years of blogging

This week is my 10th blogversary. I can’t believe it, 10 years! And yet, on April 27, 2007 I posted my first blog post and this skirt was the first project I blogged about:

Now I would say that these are not  my colours, but I loved that skirt and have worn it often.

So many things happen in 10 years, both in sewing and in personal life. I never said much about my personal life on my blog, but as in any life there were ups and downs. Moving house last year certainly feels like a positive change and both DH and I are happy with the place we live now. Our children grew up and from teenagers became young adults that study, work, travel and see more of the world than I did at their age. I’m a proud mother .

I thought it would be nice to make a selection of garments I made in those 10 years but that’s not working. Quite a few photos on the blog have been lost, probably because of Picasa stopped being available. What’s left really is a trip down memory lane for me (garments I didn’t like that much after all, garments that I loved and wore till they fell apart, garments that have special memories), but hey, why should I bother you with that. If you want to, you can still see the old posts, I’ve not removed anything.

If you’ve followed me that long (and I know some of you do, thank you!!) you’ll know I wrote a lot about lingerie sewing in the beginning. That was new, no one was writing about it then. My sewing evolved and I took on more difficult projects, started to draft some of my garments and wrote about that process too.

Apart from the writing itself, starting this blog about sewing 10 years ago and posting reviews on Pattern Review opened a new world for me. Till then sewing was a solitary hobby for me. None of my friends sewed. Through blogging I found new friends who sew and don’t find it strange if I send them a picture of fabric and/or pattern with the question whether it matches, or asking for advice on something sewing related. Some I meet in real life, with others I discuss sewing through e-mails. Some friends I now see regularly and with quite a few we have the annual sewing get-together in Canterbury. Can’t imagine my life without those real-life or distant friends any more. I’m very grateful to have met you all.

The blogging world has changed over the years. I won’t go into that much, others have done that more eloquently than I can. My blogging and sewing has changed too, not with more frequent, sponsored posts, but less posts in more infrequent intervals. Sometimes I can write 3 posts in a week, then disappear again for a few weeks. It’s what it is, there are only 24 hours in a day and so much I want to do. There certainly is also a lot sewing related that I want to do and I will continue writing my irregular posts about it.

Thank you for reading my blog, cheering me by your comments. It’s lovely to be part of the international sewing community. As it’s been a long time I’ve done this, I do a give-away to celebrate my blogversary. I’ll give away a copy of the May issue of Knip mode or BurdaStyle (Dutch editions). Leave a comment on this post, indicating whether you’d like the Knip mode or BurdaStyle. I’ll do a draw next Saturday, April 29). I’ll send it anywhere in the world (it’s just one magazine, but you may choose which one you want).

Knip mode line drawings

BurdaStyle overview

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To conclude: StyleArc Evie top, almost finished. It has a high hem in front, lower in the back. Great style for working in my allotment garden. Certainly a nice style for wearing in general too.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Sewing, not blogging

It’s been a few weeks again. I’ve been sewing, but have not taken the time to write blog posts. Apart from time, it has also to do with a feeling that there’s nothing new to tell. I’m sewing basic things, some I’ve sewn often before. Like this blouse:

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The pattern is from Ottobre, with a few changes for fit (mainly hip area). Over the years I’ve sewn several variations, from plain white (always useful) to very colourful ones, like this new one. I bought the fabric recently and it’s a lovely quality cotton. A lot like Liberty cotton, but Liberty prints aren’t my style. I liked this fabric because of the irregular print and the many colours. A lot of combinations are possible. A teal skirt in exact the right shade is on my to do list. A summer top that’s a nice variation from my default black/white theme.

Which brings me to the next top, made from a viscose (rayon) fabric that’s been in my closet for a while.

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This is the Knip Mode pattern (April 2017 issue) that I showed in my previous post. Nice result though the neckline is a bit wide on my narrow shoulders. I’m pleased with the look of the darts in the neckline. I will probably wear this top quite a bit during summer but will not use it for the silk fabric that I considered using with this pattern. It’s a quick make with no surprises. The neckline has a wide facing, which is easier to sew than a strip of bias binding.

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There are a few other garments “in production”. More on those later.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Comparing sloper and pattern

In a post some time ago I mentioned using my sloper as a tool to analyse the fit of a pattern. Today I did that again and took some pictures of the process.
To understand what I’m comparing it’s important to know what my sloper stands for. I made my sloper in Suzy Furrer’s Craftsy class The bodice sloper. You start with a moulage which is tightly fitted to your body. From this moulage you make the sloper which has the (minimum) amount of ease needed for a fitted blouse/dress/skirt etc. This sloper is the base for the pattern drafting you do.
The pattern I traced is a top from Knip mode, issue April 2017 that was in the shops this week. Some nice patterns in it! I like the neckline of this top for summer, not too sure about the dropped shoulder. On the other hand: sometimes you have to try something different. This is the line drawing and a picture form the Knip mode shop on their website, which has more pictures (front and back!) than you see in the magazine.

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My first check was the hip. The center back lines from the pattern and my sloper are matched and you can see that the size for hip height should be a 44.
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In the same way I checked the upper part, but the pictures are not clear with all the lines from the pattern sheet in it. So here you see it after I traced the pattern. For the top part I traced a size 40, 2 sizes smaller than my hip. Something I expected to do.
You can see the front is wider than my sloper*, which is fine, as the style is wider. The bust dart is not at the same height but is pointing upwards more. The dart on the sloper is horizontal. So I’m fine there too probably. I like it the pattern still has a dart, gives a bit more shape.
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The red line I added to the sloper is the bust line (strange it doesn’t look at a right angle here), the red line in the traced pattern indicated the opening line. Good to judge whether you’re fine with that point or want it changed (sloper shifted to the right to make the picture)
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This is the back pattern and sloper. There will be no dart in the top so it will be a bit wide too due to the style. By the look of this I expect it to be fine. Though I consider making a center back seam and take it in. Adaption for my figure, nothing wrong in the pattern.
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The length!! There is no indication on the Knip Mode picture how long it is. In the instructions it is indicated as 69,5 cm long (about 27 inches). That’s rather long for a top, my sloper ends at hip height (fullest part) and it’s much longer than that. I’m going to shorten it, this is tunic/short dress length. Will save on fabric too.
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This excercise does not tell me how the style will look on me or whether the fit is perfect, but for me it helps to define whether the pattern is not too small or much too wide.
I have two nice silk fabrics that I want to use but based on this comparison I feel it might be better to make it from another fabric first. I’m a little in doubt about the width of the neckline and that’s not to be judged by the flat pattern only.

NB: the sloper has no seam allowances. Knip mode doesn't have seam allowances to their patterns so it's easy to compare. If your pattern has seam allowances make sure you mark those first before doing the comparison!!

*Excuse all the lines on the sloper. I’ve adapted the first version I once made and just re-used it. As I’m the only one working with this it’s fine.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

A Lekala blouse

As some of you already thought, sewing is a bit low on the priority list at the moment. Which is bad, as I absolutely need new clothes. Yes, I know, there should be enough but I’m missing a few things to get good combinations.

A nice, easy to make pattern is helpful when time is an issue. I didn’t take the time to draft myself but bought a Lekala blouse pattern that I liked.

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Their prices are low and for me their way of making a pattern seems to work. The winter coat was good (worn it very often) and this blouse is a good basic. Shoulder princess seams, shawl collar, clean lines.

I made it from fabric that was gifted to me by a sewing friend during our annual sewing retreat in Canterbury. She thought it was a “Sigrid” fabric and she was right. Said something along the same lines being “me fabric” in my previous post, think I’m quite predictable in what I like and what I don’t like. Good thing probably, though I’m looking for a bit more colour in my spring clothes.

This fabric has a graphic print with lines that are not continuous. I think it give a very nice effect to the blouse. I’m very pleased with the result.

Samira, thank you again!

 

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Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Top finished

The top I drafted is made up in fashion fabric. A remnant piece that I found at the fabric market last year. Did not know the contents but as it was a “Sigrid” fabric (as one of my friends immediately said when I showed the picture in our Whatsapp group) I had to buy it.

It was not complicated to draft and an easy make too. Only the point of the v-neckline requires some thought and I might do it a little different next time. There certainly will be a next time as I like the neckline a lot. The pleat is not something I will repeat too often, but it’s a nice detail.

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This was the original inspiration garment.

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PS: thanks to those who commented on keeping a diary of my allotment plans a few posts ago. I’m experimenting with OneNote and an (old-fashioned?) paper notebook. It crossed my mind to start a blog about it too, but I’m such a beginner. Plus the time it takes. Might change my mind.

Perhaps I’ll do a closing picture occassionally like this, my tomato seedlings and part of the plot (after some work has been done).

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